Tag Archives: target

Hacking with mobile devices an INTRODUCTION

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Mobile Devices
Mobile phones and personal data assistant (PDA) appliances used to be limited in their functionality; however, today there are wireless devices that operate using advanced operating systems and support applications that are incredibly useful for conducting clandestine activities. As an example, Apple’s iPod touch runs on the UNIX-Darwin kernel, which is open source,2 POSIX compliant, and single UNIX specification version 3 (SUSv3) compliant. Because of this, advanced hacker appli- cations can be built and installed onto the device, making the iPod touch a powerful hacking platform.

Regardless, there are some interesting trends that we can examine and use to our advantage.
The first trend is the use of open-source operating systems. As already mentioned, the iPod touch and the iPhone, both products of Apple Inc., uses the Darwin operating system. Additional proprietary applications, including graphic interface software, have been added to these portable devices; however, the core system is undeniably UNIX based.
The second trend is the increase in computing power and memory. Although the iPod touch does not have the processing capabilities of desktops or even laptops, they are quite capable of processing large amounts of data rapidly. As a benchmark test, the iPod touch (first generation) was able to process 577 MD5 hashes per second using the password cracking tool “John the Ripper.” In comparison, the MacBook Pro with a 2.8GHz Intel Core Duo processor was able to process 7674 per second. Although about one-twelfth the capability of the MacBook Pro, the iPod touch results are still impressive for what many consider as simply a fancy MP3 player.
The method of obtaining applications needed for penetration testing or covert audio and video communication will vary, depending on the mobile platform. In the case of the Droid and Palm Pre, access to the underlying operating system is avail- able by design. However, in the case of the iPod touch, access to the operating system can only be achieved by “jailbreaking” the phone, which circumvents protection mechanisms installed by Apple.
The actual method of jailbreaking varies, depending on the generation of the iPod touch and the version of the installed software (HOW TO jailbreak is explained in another post -same hack section). Once jailbroken, we can place applications on our device through different repositories – the most notable is called “Cydia.” More information on Cydia can be found at http://cydia.saurik.com/.
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Can armed humanitarian intervention ever be justified?

Since its beginnings armed humanitarian intervention has represented a dilemma to war, peace and international ethics because it involves the moral issue of when to intervene and if these interventions are justifiable.  Moreover there are the different theories in favour and against of armed intervention. This essay will discuss:  Can armed humanitarian intervention ever be justified?

In order to make this essay clearer is to believe that a couple of definitions should be made beforehand; humanitarian intervention and armed intervention. Firstly, ‘humanitarian intervention is traditionally defined as the use of force by states to protect human rights. This definition presumes that states should do the intervening in order to maintain civil rights and of course the welfare and peace in society’.[1]Nowadays, it is sometimes argued that this traditional definition is obsolete because humanitarian intervention is increasingly a matter of collective action under UN auspices, not action undertaken by states acting on their own authority and under their own law. Secondly, we speak of armed intervention when that exercise involves the use of military force. An armed intervention is humanitarian when its aim is to protect innocent people who are not nationals of the intervening state from violence perpetrated or permitted by the government of the target state.[2] Additionally, armed intervention to stop a massacre is likely to be only the first of many measures needed to restore order to a chaotic society and prevent subsequent massacres. If prevention is important, then is to believe that the challenge for humanitarian policy is to move from responding to humanitarian crises to forestalling them.

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Is anarchy a serious obstacle to co-operation?

In International Relations the concept of anarchy has been broadly discussed for several reasons; some scholars may argue that anarchism can be beneficial among the states and even more beneficial in IR dealings between countries. In opposition other scholars believe that anarchism is a serious obstacle to co-operation. This essay will discuss Is anarchy a serious obstacle to co-operation?

Yes; it is. The reason that makes me get in this position is the following: from the definition anarchy is defined as: “a system operating in the absence of any central government. Does not imply chaos, but in Realist theory the absence of political authority.”[1] Furthermore; in order to answer this question correctly, concepts involving Realism, Critical theory and Constructivism arise because they define the path in IR about anarchy most recently in the last years.

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