Tag Archives: ports

Beware of unflod virus on jailbroken devices!!!


Users on a jailbreak subreddit have discovered a new kind of malicious software on iOS phones. The malware, which comes as a library called unfold.dylib, was uncovered after a Reddit user complained of crashes in Google Hangout and Snapchat.
The threat, which has been nicknamed “unflod baby panda,” is rumored to be of Chinese origin. There are several factors that support this theory. According to German mobile security firm SektionEins, the infection is digitally signed with an iPhone developer certificate under the name Wang Xin. Also, the malware, which steals the Apple ID and password of users, sends the information in plain text to, which appears to be a Chinese website from the error message it displays. However, these could all be fake. SektionEins even raised the possibility of certificate theft. So for now, no one knows where the malware came from and how it got into iOS devices.
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Hacking with mobile devices PART IV (FINAL)



Collecting data at a remote site requires that we remove it somehow – if we have a continuous connection, such as a reverse shell, then we can collect the data real time. However, if we deposit our mobile device with the intention of concealing it for an extended period of time, then we need to worry about a few issues as follows:
1. Preventing discovery of our collected data while on-site
2. Providing concealment during the duration of the event
3. Extracting the data safely


If we use mobile devices to collect and transmit data, we should be selective in our choices of devices and ensure that they are capable of encrypting any data at rest or in motion. Earlier models of most mobile devices are incapable of full disk encryption, which puts the device and us at risk if discovered and forensically examined; we, therefore, need to look for devices that will allow us to keep our
activities secret or provide a mechanism for covering our tracks if discovered.

Data at Rest

The newer mobile devices claim to provide something similar to full disk encryption. Although the ability of these devices to be able to protect data against forensic analysis is questionable, the devices are getting better at addressing the security of data at rest. We can do a few additional tasks to encrypt data at rest on our mobile devices to increase our comfort level about our hacking data.
Naturally, we cannot encrypt scripts that we need to run during our collection or attack phases; however, once we have collected the data, we can encrypt the data using strong passwords. The program gpg is one method of securing a file through symmetric encryption. It is possible to encrypt a file with the GNU Privacy Guard (GNU PG) application, which can be installed on a jailbroken iPod touch.
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Hacking with mobile devices PART III


Web Hacking

Although we cannot get more robust applications loaded onto the iPod touch, such as Core IMPACT or HP WebInspect, there are still some good applications available. For example Nikto open-source (GPL) Web server scanner version information; Nikto is a Perl application available for download at http://cirt .net/nikto2.
Ranked #12 of the top 100 network security tools by Insecure.org, Nikto will scan a server for configuration files, cgi applications, outdated version information, and a multitude of other bits of data that can be useful in a penetration test. Although most of the work done by Nikto focuses on information gathering, it does a pretty good job of identifying potential vulnerabilities when found.

Wireless Attacks

Unfortunately, the iPod touch’s wireless chip cannot be placed into promiscuous or monitor mode, meaning we cannot obtain wireless data necessary to conduct brute force attacks against wireless access points using encryption. There are other mobile devices that can be set for promiscuous or monitor mode, so if a brute force attack is an absolute necessity, there are options available. However, there is an application that can intercept traffic on a wireless network called “Pirni,” written by Axel Moller also available through Cydia.
The program is configured to intercept all traffic intended for the default router ( in this particular network) through ARP spoofing. Based on the Berkley Packet Filter (BPF) values, the only traffic that will be collected is TCP segments leaving the network, destined for port 80. The BPF can be modified to capture whatever type of traffic we are after. The Regex Options are used to immediately capture interesting packets, such as usernames and passwords.
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Hacking with mobile devices PART I


To understand the true capabilities of idevices, let us look at some of the different stages conducted during a professional penetration test and see how we can use mobile devices in each stage. Although availability of tools will vary with each
mobile device, we will examine those tools available to the iPod touch.

Information Gathering

To gather information about a target network, we can use functionality already built into most mobile devices. An Internet Web browser is a natural starting tool to gather information on corporations, employees, and networks. However, a browser can only give us so much information – additional tools we can install include Nmap and Telnet, which allows us to scan a target system or network and connect with discovered systems.

The advantage of using a repository like Cydia is that the program has already been compiled and can be installed on the iPod touch with no more than a click of a button. In fact, the number of applications available for the iPod touch through the Cydia repository are so numerous that very few hacker applications need to be compiled separately – the work has almost been entirely done for us.
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