Category Archives: British Politics

¿Qué es exactamente el Reino Unido?

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El Reino Unido es un país de países, es decir un conjunto de países, exactamente cuatro: Inglaterra, Escocia, Gales e Irlanda del Norte. Esas cuatro naciones conforman la totalidad del Reino Unido, que es un Estado soberano unitario cuyo régimen de gobierno es la Monarquía parlamentaria bicameral, que tiene sede en Londres.

Queda claro, entonces, que el Reino Unido es mucho más que solo Inglaterra, aunque de hecho Inglaterra sea la nación más poblada y poderosa del Reino Unido. Pero, ¿cuál es la diferencia entre el Reino Unido y Gran Bretaña exactamente? La diferencia es meramente geográfica.

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UK General Elections 2015

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As voting begins after one of the longest campaigns in memory, opinion polls suggest that the UK general election remains too close to call. Nearly all the polls published in the last two days have Labour and the Conservatives tied, with only a handful giving one or the other a narrow advantage.

The lead has ebbed and flowed in the week’s before the election, and almost always remained within the margin or error, as likely to have been caused by statistical vagaries as by real voting trends. The bookies are convinced that the Conservatives will end up with more seats than Labour, but they too are little help when it comes to predicting who will be PM: many are offering the same odds on Ed Miliband and David Cameron.

When is the 2015 general election?

Today. Thursday 7 May was the date decreed by the Fixed Term Parliament Act, introduced by the coalition early in this parliament. 

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Who Won The European Elections 2014?

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Ukip has swept the European elections, taking 4,351,204 votes, ahead of Labour by around 300,000 votes., roughly the same number of votes that Ed Miliband’s party bested the Conservatives by.

David Cameron was beaten in the third place for the first time in living memory, with his coalition partner the Lib Dems losing all but one of their 10 MEPs, their vote share down by 6.8%.

A ballot box containing votes in local elections is emptied at Trinity School in Croydon
The BNP suffered annihilation, losing 5.1% of the vote and losing their MEP, leader Nick Griffin.

With dozens of parties on the ballot paper across the country, all managed to pick up a few thousand votes. In last place was Liberty GB, with a mere 2,494 votes. The tiny party was created by “disgruntled members” of the BNP, according to the Guardian.

THE RESULTS
UK Independence Party 27.5% (+11%) 23 MEPs (+10)
Labour 25.4% (+9.7%) 18 MEPs (+7)
Conservative 23.9% (-3.8%) 18 MEPs (-7)
Green 7.9% (-0.75%) 3 MEPs (+1)
Liberal Democrat 6.9% (-6.8%) 1 MEP (-9)
Plaid Cymru 0.7% (-0.2%) 1 MEP
Scottish National Party 2.4% (-0.3%) 2 MEPs
An Independence From Europe 1.5% (new party)
BNP 1.1% (-5.1%) 0 MEPs (-2)
English Democrats 0.8% (-1.%)
Christian Peoples Alliance 0.3% (-1.3%)
NO2EU 0.2% (-0.8%)
4 Freedoms Party (UK EPP) 0.18%
We Demand a Referendum 0.15%
National Health Action Party 0.15%
Animal Welfare Party 0.13%
Britain First 0.13%
Yorkshire First 0.12%
Europeans Party 0.07%
The Peace Party 0.06%
Pirate Party 0.05%
Harmony Party 0.05 %
Communities United Party 0.04%
Socialist Party of Great Britain 0.04%
National Liberal Party 0.04%
Socialist Equality Party 0.03%
Socialist Labour Party 0.03%
The Roman Party 0.02%
YOURvoice 0.02%
Liberty GB 0.02%
The MEPs Elected Across The UK
Eastern Region

1. Patrick O’Flynn (UKIP)
2. Victoria Ford (Con)
3. Richard Howitt (Lab)
4. Stuart Agnew (UKIP)
5. Geoffrey Van Orden (Con)
6. Tim Aker (UKIP)
7. David Bannerman (Con)

East Midlands Region

1. Roger Helmer (UKIP)
2. Emma McClarkin (Con)
3. Glenis Willmott (Lab)
4. Margaret Parker (UKIP)
5. Andrew Lewer (Con)

London Region

1. Claude Moraes (Lab)
2. Syed Kamall (Con)
3. Mary Honeyball (Lab)
4. Gerard Batten (UKIP)
5. Lucy Anderson (Lab)
6. Charles Tannock (Con)
7. Seb Dance (Lab)
8. Jean Lambert (Green)


Guide to the 2014 European and local elections

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Latest updates
Farage: UKIP has election ‘momentum’
Eurosceptic ‘earthquake’ rocks EU
Under pressure Clegg: I won’t quit
There are local council elections in England and Northern Ireland – but the big one this year is the European election on the same day. It is the only time outside of a general election when all 46 million voters can take part. The European Parliament is the only directly elected institution in the European Union. So this is your chance to decide who represents you in Brussels and Strasbourg (Yes, they still shuttle between the two parliament buildings at regular intervals).

How do I know if I can vote?

Most people should have received polling cards through the post. To be eligible to vote, you had to be on the electoral register by 6 May. Anyone over 18 on 22 May who is a British citizen living in the UK, a qualifying Commonwealth citizen living in the UK, a citizen of the Republic of Ireland living in the UK, or an EU citizen living in the UK can vote if there is a local election where they live. British citizens living overseas can also vote in the European elections provided they have registered as overseas electors. EU citizens living in the UK can only vote in the European Parliament elections if they don’t vote in their home member state.
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Is Democracy such a good thing?

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The concept of democracy in politics is still seen by some countries as “the best and most effective type of government” because it provides with the same opportunities and the same equality to all its members. However even when in Western countries democracy is effective and it seems to be partially fair; democracy still has a long way to come in developing countries. This essay will discuss Is democracy such a good thing?

The name of the greatest Greek invention is today known as democracy and had the principle of Isonomy which refers to the same rules for everyone. Therefore there was nobody up the law and obedience was a global concept. Nevertheless, democracy was born between conflicts and instead of solving them, they appear to grow partially even at a wide range in the 21th century. The reason is the more freedom we have the less tranquillity we live in. Moreover, Finer (1997)[1] was correct in acknowledging the Athenian contribution to Western politics: “the Greeks invented two of the most potent political features of our present age: they invented the very idea of citizen- as opposed to subject- and they invented democracy”.

Even so, to answer if democracy is such a good thing is necessary to define the vices and virtues of such regime so we can have a clear view of what we are dealing with.

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The United Nations is nothing more than an arena for inter-state power politics.

In the aftermath of the Second World War, the United Nations reflected the hope for a just and peaceful global community. It is the only global institution with the legitimacy that derives from universal membership. However, in the last decades there is still the debate about the role of this organization in International Relations; this essay will discuss: The United Nations is nothing more than an arena for inter-state power politics.

In order to answer this question correctly is believed two concepts most arise beforehand.

First, The United Nations: which is an international organization founded in 1945 after the Second World War by 51 countries committed to maintaining international peace and security, developing friendly relations among nations and promoting social progress, better living standards and human rights. The work of the United Nations reaches every corner of the globe. Although best known for peacekeeping, peacebuilding, conflict prevention and humanitarian assistance the organization works on a broad range of fundamental issues, from sustainable development, environment and refugees protection, disaster relief, counter terrorism, disarmament and non-proliferation, to promoting democracy, human rights, governance, economic and social development and international health, clearing landmines, expanding food production, and more, in order to achieve its goals and coordinate efforts for a safer world for this and future generations.[1]

Second, Power politics: is essentially a way of understanding the world of international Relations: nations compete for the world’s resources and it is to a nation’s advantage to be manifestly able to harm others. It prioritizes national self-interest over the interest of other nations or the international community.[2]

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What role do pressure groups play in the British political system?

In the last years the role of pressure groups in the political process have been broadly discussed as the groups roles today seems to be unclear and the level of influence is difficult to measure. This essay will discuss. What role do pressure groups play in the British political system? Why are some groups more influential than others?

As a common definition: pressure groups are voluntary organisations formed to advance or defend a common cause or interest. Therefore they are unlike political parties in that they do not wish to assume responsibility for governing the country; rather they seek to influence those who do so. [1]To some extend, pressure groups do not aspire to govern the country and are concerned with a relatively narrow range of problems; is has been argued that much of their work is non-political but as much as their concerns and aspirations are affected by government they seek to have an influence over the conduct of public policy. Another view is “Pressure groups seek to influence rather than power, yet pluralist argue that power is effectively dispersed through the widespread influence of countless groups on government and policy making”. [2] Additionally, groups seek to defend and advance their own interest or cause, and government policy or specific decisions may affect them adversely or beneficially. Therefore they have a strong motive to seek to influence government, especially as power in the British political system is concentrated with the core executive. However, the universe of pressure groups now requires more systematic subdivisions. The problem at once encountered is that the traditional ways of doing it hardly seem adequate. The oldest classification in the technical literature is the one introduced in 1935 by Harwood Childs of Princeton University[3], who distinguished between those groups “whose community of interests is based on such fundamental differentials as age, sex, occupation and race, from those existing merely to further special ideas or groups of ideas. Furthermore, because their concerns are liable to be affected by government decisions, they need to be organised in order to influence ministers and respond to what they propose. “In Britain the tendency is to use the term ‘pressure groups’ and then to sub-divide them into different categories. The world ‘pressure’ has an unfortunate connotation and many groups operate without resorting to any degree of coercion”.[4] In both case and its simplest; pressure groups are not counting political parties that influence or attempt to influence the public authorities, mainly the central government and they traditionally operated at four main levels, seeking to influence the Executive, the Legislature, the Judiciary and the public at large. In Britain and Europe, they tend to be more closely associated with government.

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