Monthly Archives: January 2012

Is anarchy a serious obstacle to co-operation?

In International Relations the concept of anarchy has been broadly discussed for several reasons; some scholars may argue that anarchism can be beneficial among the states and even more beneficial in IR dealings between countries. In opposition other scholars believe that anarchism is a serious obstacle to co-operation. This essay will discuss Is anarchy a serious obstacle to co-operation?

Yes; it is. The reason that makes me get in this position is the following: from the definition anarchy is defined as: “a system operating in the absence of any central government. Does not imply chaos, but in Realist theory the absence of political authority.”[1] Furthermore; in order to answer this question correctly, concepts involving Realism, Critical theory and Constructivism arise because they define the path in IR about anarchy most recently in the last years.

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Días de Dragón (El Año Nuevo Chino 2012)

Hoy empieza el Año del Dragón, considerada por mucha gente la criatura más poderosa del zodiaco chino. En la cultura asiática el Año del Dragón es auspicioso para el matrimonio, los nacimientos y el éxito. Pero también trae complicaciones: la mítica criatura tiene grandes poderes relacionados al agua y la lluvia, lo que puede significar ‘según dicen’ buenas cosechas pero también inundaciones y otros desastres naturales. Según comentan algunos astrólogos chinos. Yo personalmente me inclino hacia el hecho de que arranco el año nuevo chino. Para casi 1.500 millones de chinos ha comenzado este fin de semana el año 4.710 del calendario, el año del Dragón.

A nivel mitológico y zodiacal el dragón es un animal muy especial, porque las cabezas de estas bestias ahuyentan el mal. Se augura por tanto un año de tranquilidad en el que habrá cambios positivos y se retomará una “dirección más correcta” en el ámbito económico…pero; para quien? 

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Motorsport Autoshow 2012 v.2.1

This sunday 15th 2012 I had the chance to enjoy one of the most exciting and breath taking experiences known to man. Supercars, cars, more cars and of course… women. What a good mix isnt it? I wanted to take the opportunity and share a little my experience. Enjoy! 

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Motorsport Autoshow 2012 v.2.2

Cars, engines, exhausts, tyres….women. Simply awesome!

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Motorsport Autoshow 2012 v.2.3

Last but not least; the saga continues!

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The myth of ‘The Cave’

What people in this situation would take for truth would be nothing but the shadows of manufactured objects’

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This statement makes allusion to the allegory of the cave. In this case Plato makes reference to the cave we all live in. Is the world of shadows; the world of our own reality. It is to believe that this assertion makes mention to our own perception of this world is not very brightly. At a simply view we can tell that ‘real’ is described as experiences in which we can smell, touch, see and feel; everything that leads to our senses; in this scenario reality is everything we do when we are awake and conscious. The truth of what we believe real when we are trapped inside the cave is described as “dark as a tunnel without lights.” There is only a bright of light at the end, which allow us to see some shadows and some objects that we will say and believe they are real; even when they are not. Therefore, even when we are inside this darkness, how is possible to realize that we are deep in the shadows? I mean; there is a reality without these shadows we live on that we had never seen. The main issue that Plato put into consideration is that we don’t know until what level we have certainty or knowledge about “the world as it really is and not as we think it is”. It is believed that the main purpose in the allegory was to illustrate the perception of objects as we describe them as genuine when in reality they are not.

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Can democracy ever be ‘fully’ consolidated?

In democratic theories there is the debate whether democracy can be fully consolidated or not. There is the common argument that consolidation is possible in every democratic regime, but a ‘fully consolidation’ seems to be more unlikely.  This essay will discuss: Can democracy ever be ‘fully consolidated’?

In the last decades ‘democracy has been widely recognized as the best political regime yet invented, because its citizens are both treated with respect, dignity and have some say in political decision-making’.[1] In this sense, democracy can be consolidated, but not completely. To understand this: consolidation is seen as a scale; because of multiple different factors that are used to work out whether a democracy is consolidated or not. Therefore, it would be wrong to see democratic consolidation as a dichotomy. For example; if two democracies (A,B) were equal in almost every way sharing similar political institutions, ethnic divisions, size, region, political culture; it would be absurd to classify A as a consolidated democracy and B not just because A has more equality of wealth.  Instead a better classification would be to say that A is more consolidated than B. The bottom-line here is that, democratic consolidation is best understood as a scale; this means that for a country to be ‘fully consolidated’ it must be at the very top of the consolidation scale. Moreover, for a country to be consolidated it would have to be on balance more likely to it to remain a democracy than to revert back to a non-democracy. In this case; it could be argued that for such a state to exist is almost impossible as for it to do so all the possibly relevant factors would have to be a factor strengthening democracy or at least not weakening it. To a national level, even in Britain for example, the lack of a codified constitution, the rise of BNP and declining turnout can all be pointed to as factors which make Britain’s democracy not fully consolidated because under the right conditions they could make the UK slide into authoritarianism.  Although this is not likely the existence of these weaknesses in Britain’s democracy still mean that the UK can’t be called a fully consolidated democracy.

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